About me

Am I not the cutest girl ever?

 You’re my wife now

I blog about topics that interest me. These topics will include  an eclectic mix of statistics, economics, politics, and philosophy. My background is in Statistics and Accountancy.  I have also taught in higher and further education.

I hope my posts will be brief, to the point, interesting, accurate and illuminating. Comments are welcome.

Ricardian Equivalence is dead. Long live Keynes!

Introduction In this piece, I show how government spending on capital projects can be beneficial to the private sector. The demonstration shows the oft-cited objection to government spending, so called Ricardian Equivalence, is not correct. I use an example, which hints at the proposed HS2 rail project, to make my point. I also use accepted … Continue reading

Beware the ideas of IDS

Introduction I am a proponent of Negative Income Tax (NIT). I am because it can deliver social security via a basic income, because it is simple and cheap to administer, and because it is libertarian. In this piece, I try to set out why implementing NIT in Britain does not require any radical surgery to … Continue reading

Using the tax system to deliver a living wage

In a previous post, I proposed a formula for calculating income tax that would provide for a  negative income tax. I did so because I believe a negative income tax system would be simpler, fairer, more humane, technically more feasible , and cheaper to develop than the current Universal Credit project being rolled out by … Continue reading

Self-employment and negative income tax

Introduction Previously, in “Is Universal Credit the wrong approach?”, I proposed that a thoughtfully designed negative income tax system would be more effective in delivering UC’s stated aims. I believe UC is fundamentally flawed, primarily because it does not address the UK’s low and falling wages. The feasibility of designing incentives to make work pay … Continue reading

Is Universal Credit the wrong approach?

“Work doesn’t pay” is the oft cited justification for Universal Credit (UC). It’s not clear that rolling up six separate benefits into one single payment will address this  problem, aka the unemployment trap. Wages in the UK are at best static and may have been falling in real terms over the last decade. Coupled with … Continue reading

Should the poor be afraid of a “Flat-rate” tax?

I believe it depends on three things: How income is defined; The tax-free personal allowance; and The tax rate Realised comprehensive income In the UK there are three taxes that could be consolidated into a single income tax. These three taxes are Inheritance Tax, Capital Gains Tax, and the current income tax. All three levy … Continue reading